Soldiers saw flying saucers in Iraq on December 2009


On December 26, 2009, soldiers were in the town of Majar al-Kabir (in southern Iraq). While they were on mission, they saw several flying saucers in the sky. One of the witnesses told the story.

Witness statement:

I was with an US Army infantry team in Southern Iraq at the time. We were on mission, sitting stationary in 3 humvees near the Iraq/Iran border, watching for mortar fire. After about 30 minutes of sitting in place in total blackout, the lead humvee gunner, Specialist Henry Merrill spotted one glowing, pulsating circular object hovering close to a mile away at about 45 degrees from horizon. The object then began to sway, almost like a slow dance before it started to seperate into dozens of different but similar objects. All objects continued to sway in unison as the seperation continued to fill the sky over a period of 30 minutes. Rhe movements were all similar, literally had the feeling of an aerial slow dance. Moving closer amd further away, spinning, almost seeming to change shape, all simultaneously. The objects then stopped, rapidly got in-line back to the 45 degree inclination before descending below the horizon. When I first noticed the object my first thought was that it was either a star or a distant helicopter. That thought only lasted about a minute before I realized it was neither based on the movement and the fact that the objects were ONLY visible through infrared. At first I felt worried that nobody knew what the original aircraft was. Once it started seperating, I became less worried the object was hostile and just became puzzled. The feeling of worry was rekindled when the objects got in line because this was so different from the previous movements and seemed almost hostile, like an attack formation. Once the objects descended, we all decided to end the mission early and RTB.

Photo: Maysan Governorate, bTUBS Own workThis vector graphics image was created with Adobe Illustrator.This file was uploaded with Commonist.This vector image includes elements that have been taken or adapted from this:  Iraq location map.svg (by NordNordWest)., CC BY-SA 3.0Link

Source

0 comments: